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the administration thought it had to take a lot more assertive action. >> what is the pressure of russia, on moscow to dole with this? they've been backing their ally syria. where are they? >> secretary clinton met with the foreign minister of russia a couple of days ago. obviously russia has backed another loser, its propensity in these things. i think they even see this now. probably the best-case scenario is there's some sort of soft landing where assad is offered an exile deal, gets out of the picture. and then you start the retribution massacres and it could turn into something extremely ugly. the hope is russia will get on board and be constructive. the foreign minister said good things but we'll see what russia does. >> what does an intervention looks like? >> if chemical weapons are used, i think it looks a lot like the air strikes in libya. you have to destroy some of those major stockpiles of chemical weapons. if they start to lose control and there are fores that hezbollah might get ahold of them, you might see some special forces on the ground. the idea of chemical weapons, especially f
children. president vladimir putin signed the law this week. >> you know, russia actually ranks third of all the countries for u.s. adoptions, just behind china and ethiopia. but president putin has made it official, banning adoptions by americans. and it is all over a diplomatic issue. >> reporter: lee allen and his wife planned to adopt only one baby in russia, but they couldn't bear to leave behind a baby that shared the same crib. >> the boys had already made a home in my heart. and all i wanted to do was go across over to russia, go over the ocean and bring them home. and i counted the days and hours until i could do that. >> reporter: today, the two boys, jason and john christian are 13 years old, and this is how they describe their lives. >> i can't believe i'm here with the family, i love it. >> reporter: but their adoptions almost didn't happen. about the time lee allen was going to adopt them in 1999, a newly appointed president putin imposed a ban on adoptions, but that was lifted six months later. once again, russia has placed a ban on adoptions by americans. the issue has
aadodop children from russia, but that might come to an end thanks to a acontroversi controversial bill russia's parliament. >>> he's taking a bow. he's getting a second chance at a job he quit five years ago. japan's new prime minister making a stunning comeback. >>> as the sound of gunfire rings out in syrian neighborhoods, the country's military police chief has reported defected to the other side. ng. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. ...but he'd wait for her forever, for any reason, and would always be there with the biggest welcome home. for a love this strong, dawn only feeds him iams. compared to other leading brands, it has 50% more animal protein. ...to help keep rocky's body as strong as a love that never fades... if he ever lets her
and nancy cordes. elaine quijano on the family heartbreak after russia's president bans all adoptions to americans. >> we ask president putin, please, can he set an alternate means but don't let me children suffer. >> glor: he met saddam hussein and made it look easy. david martin on the death of general norman schwarzkopf and what the world did not know about him. and "on the road" with steve hartman as a man tries to save his wife of 56 years. an unusual request that gets a surprising response. >> got two of them and i only need one. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> glor: good evening, scott is off tonight. i'm jeff glor. it is the end of a holiday week, but it would appear congress is just getting started. tonight, the president said he is mottestly optimistic about a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff, which would mean avoiding automatic tax increases and spending cuts come, you know, 1. the president spoke to the nation this evening after an hour-long meeting with congressional leaders at the white house. democrat and republican leaders
as pntr, with russia and moldova and to update russian human rights legislation. we have to take many difficult votes in this chamber, but this is not one of them. in fact, this is a rare opportunity to pass a good bill that we all can agree on. pntr is good for united states jobs. russia is a fast-growing market. when russia joined the w.t.o. in august, it opened its markets to the other 155 members of the w.t.o. who have pntr with russia. pntr will give u.s. farmers, ranchers, businesses and workers new opportunities in russia and new jobs here at home. our competitors in china and canada and europe are not taking advantage of these opportunities because they have pntr with russia, they already have it. we are the only w.t.o. member missing out on these opportunities. if we now pass pntr, we can level the playing field and compete, and if we compete we will win. we sell more beef, we sell more aircraft, we will sell more trademarks, we will sell more medical equipment and our banks and insurance companies will grow. pntr will give our knowledge industries greater protections for the
to be retaliation for a new u.s. law that targets human rights abuses in russia. in the past two decades, more , mo 60,000 russian children have been given new homes inside the u.s. it elaine quijano met one family whose adoption is now on hold. >> look at this. look. >> reporter: two years ago kim and robert summers decided to adopt from russia. it took nearly 18 months, but last july, the couple was matched with a 15-month-old boy. enen you saw his picture for the first time, what did you think? k i knew that this was the child i was meant to parent. and i took one look at this little ginger boy, and i fell in love with him. >> reporter: the summers began filling their new jersey home with baby clothes, a crib, and even a stroller. they traveled to his orphanage in russia twice to bond with him. >> say, hi, daddy. >> reporter: you've given him a name. >> yes. preston mackey summers. he's a wonderful young boy who needs love and attention. >> reporter: like 1,500 other american families, the summers torry that the law banning opericans from adopting russian thedren could prevent them from bringing
? senator clinton -- secretary clinton meeting with russia, what can we do and what's the next step if they don't listen. >> it's a complex world the president is going to lead in. >> can i enter, you cover these issues all the time and did a lead story on nightly news on this topic. the question fors the president is ultimately what do you do when your foreign policy has been premised on bringing american troops home, at a time when american power and influence is needed particularly in the middle east, but there are no easy answers. this i think is what sort of calls out for an obama doctrine in a second term. he doesn't seem to have one at the moment which is a big issue. >> and doesn't have a foreign policy team yet. he's still wrestling with those decisions. more on that to come. david gregory, thank you very much. chris cizilla. coming up sunday on "meet the press," the fiscal cliff debate. the latest between house republican whip kevin mccarthy and assistant senate majority leader dick durbin, the two men who have been at the table. congress hearing from all sides on the fisc
, secretary clinton insisted that the united states and russia share common goals in the region. >> trying hard to work hard with russia to stop the bloodshed in syria and begin a political transition to a post asad future. the pressure against the regime in and around damascus seems to be increasing. lou: at home, leon pa net fa issuing the -- panetta issuing the sharpest warning yet. >> the president of the united states made it clear there will be consequences. there will be consequences if the assad regime makes a terrible mistake by using chemical weapons on their own people. lou: neither the white house or pentagon elaborating on what the cons -- consequences would be, but having russia back them would be a determined outcome made by the promise of president obama in dealing with russia after winning a second term as he remarked to the russian president thinking they were off microphone as they met in south korea back in march. >> after my election, i have more flexibility. >> i understand. i just need permission -- lou: a full report on the disturbing turn of events in syria and the
, particularly with russia in terms of getting that message out that that's a red line that can't be passed. >> how essential is russia being involved? >> russia is key. russia has been backing assad diplomatically at the u.n. and has deep ties into assad's regime. if they begin to walk away from syria and there appear to be signals that they are distancing themselves, that will put pressure on those around assad to make sure that they do not take assad's lead in potentially using these weapons and helpses move towards the resolution of this. >> you have a ground strategy perhaps being considered and then you have an air strategy. air seems to be the one that's being discussed most because it can be most surgical. is there such a thing when we're talking about chemical weapons as being a surgical military option? >> there is not a clear surgical military it would take 75,000 troops to secure the sites that we know of, dropping ordinance on-sites that have sarin and even mustard gas and other nerve agents can be very damaging, get blown away in the wind. it's not clear this is surgical. the
coming to us from the moscow airport where a russian plane has crashed. russia's interior ministry said the plane overshot the runway. eight people are on board, four are reported killed. four others are seriously injured. the redwing flight broke into pieces. smoke is billowing from the aircraft. the plane was heading from the czech republic. >>> people across india are mourning the death of a young woman they're calling lightning. she was savagely beaten and gang raped on a bus in new delhi earlier this month in a case which has galvanized the country. protesters have been taking part in candlelight vigils. they want more protection for women in india which has seen a surge in rape attacks. six suspects are in custody in the 23-year-old's death. they face murder as well as rape charges. >>> russia's top diplomat and international envoy to syria are warning that syria's civil war is threatening the fragile stability of the mideast. u.n. arab league envoy rahimi met with russian foreign minister lavrov in moscow today. they're trying to bring the regime and rebels to the bargaining tabl
to meet with the envoy to syria. across barbra himybill: russia s discussion in moscow. earlier in a week there was a report it was pulling support away from damascus. has that bent case? and why the relationship with russia so critical. >> reporter: it's one of the countries syria will listen to. russia could have sway over syrian president assad. >> the best issue we have is russia. russia stood up and told him to stop the chemical weapons issue and he backed off. but now he's back at it again. >> reporter: if assad does leave the immediate problem for the international community is who will take over in syria. then another key issue is how and who will secure the chemical weapons? bill: we are awaiting word from the pentagon and when that happt to you. martha: sarin gas is one of the world's most dangerous chemical weapons. experts say it has 500 times as toxic quality as cyanide does. 100 milligrams, which is one drop, can kill the average person in minutes if he or she is not given an immediate antedote. bill: syria depend on money from its oil exports. 9% of which are purchased by e
representative of syria. russia's foreign minister lashed out at those comments, saying the u.s. has placed all bets on the armed victory of the rebel coalition. >>> in mexico, fans of jenni rivera gathered for a procession and vigil to mourn the mexican american singer who was killed in a plane crash sunday. mexico's top transportation official says rivera's plane plunged almost vertically from more than 28,000 feet and may have hit the ground at more than 600 miles per hour. >>> in russia's far east, a fiery sight as a dormant volcano started erupting after almost 40 years. red-hot lava poured out as an alert went out for planes to stay back. >>> a giant asteroid known as 4179 tutotis is passing by earth within 4.3 million miles. that's close enough to view through a telescope, and it's more than 3 miles across. that's about half the size of the asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs 65 million years ago. >>> now let's get a check of wall street. the dow closed at 13,248 after gaining 78 points yesterday. the s&p added nine. the nasdaq jumped 35. overseas markets also ended on a high note. in
push to end the bloody war in syria. russia's foreign minister and the u.n. envoy, for syria are meeting today and both are calling for a a long-sd piece initiative that calls for a transitional government leading to elections. this meeting coming as new violence erupts between government and rebel forces. that violence has left dozens dead. in fact so far the death toll, it was at 40,000 and it now supposedly topped 45,000. but we are having a meeting this weekend between that u.n. envoy for syria and russia's foreign minister. they will be discussing this plan for a transitional government and we're going to talk more about that right now with fox news military analyst general jack keane, a four-star general and former vice chief of staff of the army. thank you for joining us, general. >> good to be here, patti ann. patti ann: back in june the world powers in geneva came up with this proposal for a unity government. both the assad regime and the opposition rejected it because it would involve the two sides sharing power. now they want to revive the plan but is it desirable?
as the sweetest 4-year-old boy you could ever meet. he lives in russia where the moyers visited him a few months ago with the intention of adopting him. >> we know that there are special needs children in that area of the world and that is something that we are open to and the child that we are pursing, vatalia, has down's syndrome. >> reporter: the moyers who live in georgia are facing what could be an insurmountable obstacle. president vladimir putin has indicated he will sign it into law. >> if what they say is going to happen really happens, those families are not going to be able to adopt the kids even if all the legal processes already have been in place. but much more important, let's focus on the children. what it means is those children will remain institutionalized. >> reporter: some see the russian bill as retaliation for an american law that puts restrictions on russians accused of human rights violations. according to statics by the u.s. state department, the number of russian children adopted by american couples has increased significantly in the last few years. in 2004, the number
clinton holds emergency talks with russia as u.s. officials confirm reports that the syrian military is prepared to launch chemical weapons against its own people. >> we've made it very clear what our position is with respect to chemical weapons and i think we will discuss that and many other aspects. >> the whole world is watching. the whole world is watching very closely. and the president of the united states has made very clear that there will be consequences. >> plus, sharp criticism from afghan president karzai. the exclusive nbc interview. why he says the u.s. is partly to blame for the growing instability in his country. >>> and the duchess of cambridge leaves the hospital after being treated for acute morning sickness. her royal father-in-law couldn't be happier. >> i'm not a radio station? >> grandfather, that's splendid. that's great she's getting better. >> good day, i'm chris cillizza in for andrea mitchell live in washington. behind the bluster and the rhetoric, what happens going on behind the scenes in the budget negotiations? and big breaking news in this town. senat
's war, as secretary of state hillary clinton meets with russia's foreign minister. >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a program that aims to put students at low-achieving schools on a path to high school graduation. >> we're here to make things better. we're here to tutor kids. we're here to make sure that they stay on track. we are here to make sure that they graduate. we want to prepare them for high school. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: with 25 days left until the year-end fiscal cliff, and just 19 days until christmas, president obama warn
with the international community. listen. >> another way to look at it though, he wants russia and others to notice he is taking this potentially suicidal step in the hopes of one last diplomatic solution that so far he has been against. but he may now sees a his only hope. so maybe if russia is persuaded that assad is on the doorstep of defeat or suicide for that matter, effective suicide, that russia will finally help us do a deal to get a power sharing arrangement. >> so a power sharing arrangement or perhaps trying to get some sort of asylum deal. either way, if it's the threat of chemical weapons that he is using, it seems less about negotiation and more about blackmail, shep. >> shepard: jonathan hunt, thanks very much. >> a fox urgent and news developing right now. the white house has just informed us president obama called egypt's president today to express what the white house called deep concern over the deadly protests in cairo overnight. the white house says president obama praised the egyptian president mohammed morsi for offering to meet with his opponents this weekend but said that dial
and months. lou: moving quickly to syria as we wrap up. russia today -- from the deputy foreign minister, basically saying that they have acknowledged that bashar al-assad has been losing power and that his departure is a foregone conclusion. suddenly they are talking about stng support for bashar al-assad and making it very clear that they firmly support his regime. >> the russians cannot let go. he is an allied to iran and some are anti-american. what i see now is that the civil war in syria is going to grow, unfortunntely. an opposition that cannot bring him down very fast. lou: as always, thank you for being with us. thank you. lou:much more on the obama administration's foreign-policy in the middle middle east. the "a-team" towards us coming up. federal workers are thriving in the obama economy with record paid benefits. far outpacing government workers. it seems that government workers still unhappy. unions upset with the new reality of coworker reform. alan wilson joins us and tells us why they should be cheering you right to work lou: michele obama saying that voter suppression w
we already know about russia out china and there which brings us to the big question this week -- will the president's second term triumphs be abroad or here at home? >> i think his second term will be defined by foreign policy and looming confrontation over iran. chris: politco has spoken. >> despite all of the domestic issues, he will have a bigger role to play on the world stage and brought into that with events whether it be syria, iran. >> leadership just changed in china for the first time in 10 years, the most important economic relationship we have in the world and he's got to make headway there to make sure they stay on their reform path so they continue to grow and the world economy will be stronger. >> i agree, it's unanimous, the big foreign policy challenges are coming at him. he can't avoid them. he's got to deal with iran, he's got to deal with syria, he's got to deal with afghanistan. chris: do we have a chance with iran? everybody worries about this -- do we have a chance to stop them from nuclear weaponnizing? >> yes, the elements of the deal, what's called th
of state hillary clinton held a news conference. keep in mind, russia here, really, resisted the efforts to speed the departure of the syrian leader al assad. so jill, do we know, was syria's chemical weapons, was that discussed here in this conversation between the secretary of state and the foreign minister of russia? >> reporter: well, yes. initially. there are actually two meetings between secretary clinton and the foreign minister. and you know, russia actually does -- this is one area where they do agree. russia is very much opposed to any type of use of chemical weapons and in fact secretary clinton thanked him for speaking about that which she did in brussels just yesterday, talking about that. although, brooke, you know, you have to say that the russians next breath say that they have raised that issue, in fact, with bashar al assad. the president of syria. and he assures them that there's no use intended and it is not a problem and, so, you kind of have two messages coming from the russians but you would have to say they're very much opposed to that and a lot of concern. >> so
. >> thank you. the senate just approved a trading relationship with russia, a vote on my behave and others saying we would like a better relationship with the russian people and the russian government. this is an opportunity for russia so show that vote was justifieded, and an opportunity for russia to show the international community at large that you can be a constructive force in great time of need and a great kate as a nation to do good. i find it ironic, and the red line here literally is red. the line we're crossing is 40,000 people have died. what bothers me the most is we are all on the on the mitt of killing, not the killing i.t. itself. we have to get involved age stop this before it's out of hand. what are we talking about? we want to shape what happens after assad leaves. america not being involved in this constructive way will be hard to go to the libyan -- excuse me, the syria people when they achieve freedom say we want to help you, and they will say, how are y'all? you did little in the time of need. we have a chance in the late hours of the fight to correct that i'll prese
him. they say it's okay to give him asylum. russia will not give him asylum and it seems to me that the russians are sending signals now to the opposition that, let's talk. because what the russians wanted in there they wanted to keep our number one arab ally, bashar al-assad. he's going, now they want to keep their naval case. there are so many layers and rival factions, national and international that syria will be a problem for years to come. heather: russia also saying their policies will no longer be tied tow a specific family or name, that being key as well. >> right. heather: i want to ask you in these final moments what is going on in egypt right now and how that is affect being the rest of the middle east. >> it's affecting the rest of the middle east because it gives even more momentum to the islamist tide. in this referendum which was a put up job the muslim brotherhood won. they claimed 64%, although only 30% of egyptians voted in the referendum on the constitution. the bottom line is, once islamists get power they do not want to give it up. and it's interesting to
to considering how serious russia and syria have been as allies the last couple years. look what is going on the ground. a general in charge of the military defense group, the military police there inside of afghanistan, inside of syria, pardon me, he just redecked over to turkey and is joining the rebels. this is the most serious high-ranking defects we've seen in a while. that shows another part of the momentum turning toward the rebels, away from the government who are becoming increasingly isolated inside of their cities, unable to project power. the army we heard is running out of supplies, though russia is still resupplying them as of now. but the rebels are becoming increasingly successful with their attacks. the big wildcard if russia tries to figure out a way to negotiate a settlement, what does iran do? iran is the other big supporter of syria as we reported for a long time. they sent numbers of airliners, civilian cargo planes into damascus and other airports with weapons on board, men, members of the revolutionary guard to help syria, the question is russia begins to abandon s
, french, german, russia, china, so once all tend to view it as a proliferation problem. it tends to be about that issue very narrowly focused. so to kind of move the conversation, you have to figure a different architecture to address that. but the five plus one processors such as designed to do with the proliferation issue in the conversation is that it has to do with arantxa violations of the npt that a security council resolution suggests iran activity so forth and so on. there's two countries however that suggests the issue that this is not a proliferation issue that has to do with the character for the regime but those are for israel. the second one is iran who similarly suggested that this is nice control issue from the perspective of the west, but there really is an arms control is a multilateral icing regime. there were two that is in this particular who are not accepting the argument. the argument about nuclear infractions. so having said that, if you look at it historically, the united states has managed to negotiate successfully arms control treaties with countries of
an approximation. >> this week the secretary of state hillary clinton, she met with russia's foreign minister and the u.n. special envoy to syria. as you know, russia has blocked action against al assad at the u.n., but some have speculate that had moscow may be considering a different aprove. i mean, is russia stopping the u.s., do you think, from going into syria? >> i think the russians are beginning to realize that this problem simply cannot be ignored, and their passive stance on it simply doesn't provide for any constructive solution, so i hope that they will work with us on this, and i think the more international consensus we have on what is to be done, the less likely is the danger that the removal of the regime will result in the fragmentation of syria all together and regional conflicts erupting. that is the real danger, and that's what people should be concentrating on. >> you know, some have made the comparison that getting involved with syria or in syria is similar to us getting involved in libya and taking action against libya. do you see it that way? >> not quite. i supported
. some u.s. senators say now is the time for russia to act. >> this is an opportunity for russia to show the international community at large that you can be a constructive force at a time of great need. and you have a unique capability as a nation to do some good. >> reporter: for the u.s., the insurgents gains are a double-edged sword. some of the most ruthlessly affected fighters also are the most radicalized. washington is moving to declare one of those groups a terrorist organization. but the obama administration worries that the stronger radical fighters become the more armed combat, not political efforts to find a solution will decide the outcome in syria. early next week secretary clinton travels to morocco for a meeting of the so-called friends of syria group. the focus will be on the opposition with the obama administration taking the first steps towards officially recognizing them. jill dougherty, cnn, dublin. >>> we're just a few minutes away from speaking with senator jim demint of south carolina. he's here live in "the situation room." he will explain his stunning decision
wrap up. russia today -- from the deputy foreign minister, basically saying that they have acknowledged that bashar al-assad has been losing power and that his departure is a foregone conclusion. suddenly they are talking about strong support for bashar al-assad and making it very clear that they firmly support his regime. >> the russians cannot let go. he is an allied to iran and some are anti-american. what i see now is that the civil war in syria is going to grow, unfortunntely. an opposition that cannot bring him down very fast. lou: as always, thank you for being with us. thank you. lou: much more on the obama administration's foreign-policy in the middle middle east. the "a-team" towards us coming up. federal workers are thriving in the obama economy with record paid benefits. far outpacing government workers. it seems that government workers still unhappy. unions upset with the new reality of coworker reform. alan wilson joins us and tells us why they should be cheering you right to work john is 42. mortgage. married. two great kids. he wts to protect his family with a $500,000 t
for the regime innt egypt.nths lou: as we wrap up, professor, russia today walking back the comments that had been quoted from the deputy foreign minister basically saying they acknowledge he has been losing power and that his departure is a foregones conclusion, and now they're talking but strongdden support and making it very clear that frothey firmly support hisa >> russians cannot let go until he actually goes because he is a major ally to them, he is allied to iran, some politicians in iraq are all they have to see anti-americans further so what i see now is the civil war is only going to grow unfortunately between an asset to cannot take back the country and opposition to cannot bringt him down very fast. lou: as always, thank you for being with us. first lady michelle obama slinging delegations about what she claims were voting irregularities in the presidential election. on the radio show she said voter suppression was in full force in many states all over this country.s ar the first lady cited no specifics and prompted judicial watch to iss the fina following statement. mrs. obama's
be imminent. even russia, syria's most powerful ally, is alarmed. their foreign minister met yesterday with secretary clinton, discussing the possibility of a syria without assad in power. this morning, rebels have declared damascus's airport a military target, warning civilians and airlines not to approach it. >>> and in egypt, tanks and barbed wire barricades returned to the streets of cairo as deadly protests raged outside the presidential palace. egyptian president mohamed morsi is calling for a national dialogue but is resolute about his controversial constitution. nbc's ayman mohyeldin is joining us live from cairo monitoring the situation. let's start with egypt. how much more trouble is morsi in there? >> reporter: well, he's definitely politically isolated because all of egypt's major political factions have really come out against him for both the constitutional decree that gave him absolute powers nearly two weeks ago and kicked off all of these protests, but more importantly, they're very upset with him that he's trying to ram home this constitution that was drafted by an a
a tiny fraction of this to deal with china or russia t our nuclear arsenal isn't stopping iran from trying to achieve its nuclear weapon. these are sad, missed opportunities to right size the military which will still be the most powerful in the world by far. for us to deal with veterans' needs. mr. mcgovern: additional one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. blumenauer: for us to deal with the threats that we face today, to deal with the damage that we have done in the misguided war in iraq. to be able to deal meaningfully with the guard and ready reserve that should be upgraded and healed from the damage that was inflicted upon him. we can provide far more real security, save tax dollars, deal with the needs of veterans that are about to be, sadly, undercut , and provide balance to our budget. because, in fact, the fiscal instability for reckless -- from reckless bills like that is in fact a national security threat. we are no longer going to be able to pay almost half the world's entire military budget. we should start by rejecting this authorization
. even russia, syria's most powerful ally, is alarmed. their foreign minister met yesterday with secretary hillary clinton discussing the possibility of a syria without assad in power. >> wow. >> this morning rebels have declared damascus's airport a military target, warning civilians and airlines not to approach it. >> richard, that's what we're looking at. we're looking at russia to see when russia finally gives up on assad. if they are, in fact, coming close, it's over. he's done. >> that's the beginning of the end. and i think that's finally in play. brahimi who preceded kofi annan trying to do a diplomatic process finally, i think, has something to work with. it's the possibility of the threat that the syrian regime might turn to chemical munitions, and the russians realize that would be the equivalent of jumping and that their long-term equities. the russians realize that would be too far, not on moral grounds, but on real politic rounds. so the chances of telling the syrians don't do it, but the russians saying if you do it, you won't be supported. and possibly giving
, particularly cuba, ecuador and venezuela. not on the list of places is russia and iran his two biggest military backers. this is all coming as the internal pressure on the bashar al-assad regime seems to b to be mounting. rebel fighter are moving closer and closer to damascus. the airport outside of damascus is closed. this has been up and running for the entire time this war has been fought in syria. we are hearing from intelligence sources and opposition groups in syria that rebels are making progress, taking overseer yan military bases all over the country, particularly closer to damascus. and that in the times when the syrian military does in fact try to launch some type of counter attack they often fail. that is according to opposition fighters and opposition groups in syria. so you're seeing a lot more domestic, internal pressure on the bashar al-assad regime, and that given with the international pressure we are seeing from clintonent obama ite squeezing the grip of the bashar al-assad's regime's control all over syria, jon. >> reporter: conor powell live in jerusalem. we will have a lot
to end the fighting in syria. her meeting with russia's foreign minister came as rebels intensified the fighting around the capital of damascus. now, speaking for the first time about the meeting, secretary clinton laid out her vision of a syria without president assad. >> the united states stands with the syrian people in insisting that any transition process result in a unifyied, democratic syria in which all citizens are represented; sunni, alawite, christians, kurds, jews, men, women, every syrian must be included in this process for a new and better future. and a future of this kind cannot possibly include assad. heather: secretary clinton also called the meeting a beginning and warning that there's still a lot of hard work ahead. jon? jon: the world is waiting for assad's next move. if intelligence reports are correct, he already has ordered his military to prepare chemical weapons. those, we can only presume, would be used against his own people. recent rebel victories seem to give him more incentive to use such weapons, so what can we expect if he does? how do we react, and
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